An analysis of the poem dover beach by matthew arnold

The deceptive calm of the opening lines is undercut by the grating surf on the beach. After marrying inArnold began work as a government school inspector, a grueling position which nonetheless afforded him the opportunity to travel throughout England and the Continent.

Arnold is the speaker speaking to someone he loves.

Summary and Analysis of the Poem

The poem concludes with a pessimistic outlook on the state of the planet. The whole poem is based on a metaphor — Sea to Faith. The poet begins with a broad general view from the horizon, coming closer to that which is in the forefront of his view, the sea meeting the moon-blanched land, whence comes the disturbing sound.

Dover Beach Analysis

But now I only hear Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar, Retreating, to the breath Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear [16] And naked shingles of the world.

Sophoclesa 5th-century BC Greek playwright who wrote tragedies on fate and the will of the gods, also heard this sound as he stood upon the shore of the Aegean Sea. Line length, enjambment and internal rhyme also help to add spice. His poetry is known for its contemplation of isolation, the dwindling faith of his age, and his subtle style.

A Tragedy Poems: The time when Arnold was writing this poem, England was torn between science and religion, materialism and morals and doubts and beliefs. Now though, this time as passed. Ah, love, let us be true To one another.

Throughout the whole poem, Arnold uses a metaphor to describe his views and opinions. Come to the window, sweet is the night-air.

Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold

When that rhyme is varied, as in Dover Beach, more interest is generated for the reader and listener. He speaks now directly to her, and perhaps, to all those true believers in God that are still out there. The poem is written in free verse with no particular meter or rhyme scheme, although some of the words do rhyme.

When the sea retreats, so does faith, and leaves us with nothing. Technology was taking a grip on life. Summary… This is a poem about a sea and a beach that is truly beautiful, but holds much deeper meaning than what meets the eye.

The second dominant image in the poem is in lines 25 through 28, expressing the emotional impact of the loss of faith. At the beginning of the fourth stanza it becomes clear that the companion who is looking out over the water with the speaker is most likely a lover or romantic partner.

He reflects that underneath this veneer of calm, there is something more volatile and unsettling: Ah, love, let us be true To one another.

It is fairly easily understood vocabulary, with the exception of a few words, such as cadence and darkling. It is not what it appears to be. There is varied line length, 37 in total, split into 4 stanzas, the first of which is a mixed up sonnet with a rhyme scheme abacebecdfcgfg, a sure signal of a break with convention.

He hears the sound of the sea as "the eternal note of sadness". The last important extended image closes the poem; it is a very common practice for Arnold to supply such closing, summarizing images in an attempt to say metaphorically what he perhaps cannot express directly.

Arnold looks at two aspects of this scene, its soundscape in the first and second stanzas and the retreating action of the tide in the third stanza.

In lines he is talking about a very peaceful night on the ever so calm sea, with the moonlight shining so intensely on the land. Dover Beach The sea is calm tonight.

By Matthew Arnold About this Poet Among the major Victorian writers sharing in a revival of interest and respect in the second half of the twentieth century, Matthew Arnold is unique in that his reputation rests equally upon his poetry and his prose.

Matthew Arnold’s Dover Beach: Summary & Analysis

“Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold: About the Poem English Victorian poet Matthew Arnold’s most famous poem “Dover Beach” is a dramatic monologue where the poet expresses his frustration and hopelessness of the modern chaotic world. Arguably Matthew Arnold's most famous poem, "Dover Beach" manages to comment on his most recurring themes despite its relatively short length.

Its message - like that of many of his other poems - is that the world's mystery has declined in. Matthew Arnold’s Dover Beach: Summary This is a poem about a sea and a beach that is truly beautiful, but holds much deeper meaning than what meets the eye.

The poem is written in free verse with no particular meter or rhyme scheme, although some of the words do rhyme. —Matthew Arnold. The Poem Analysis.

Interesting Literature

Matthew Arnold achieves a lonely tone in the poem “Dover Beach, ” through the use of imagery, simile, and personification. The poem begins with a simple statement: “the sea is calm tonight”.

At this early moment this is as yet nothing but a statement, waiting for the rest of the work to give it meaning.

Dover Beach Analysis

Dover Beach Essay In the symbolic poem “Dover Beach” written by Matthew Arnold the main idea is that of change. The poet uses language features and techniques such as assonance, extended metaphor and adjectives as well as using symbolism.

An analysis of the poem dover beach by matthew arnold
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Dover Beach Summary and Analysis | Matthew Arnold | English Summary